Saturday, November 1, 2014

A Taste of Yiddish 5.6

Master the Yiddish language with
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this week's proverb
אַז מ'קוקט אַרויס אויף די שווערס שטיוול, גייט מען בּאָרוועס

transliterated
az m'kukt aroys af di shvers shtivl, geyt men borves

the proverb actually means
if you are looking forward to your father in laws boots, you'll end up going barefoot

translated to Hebrew
כאשר מצפים למגפיים של החותן הולכים יחף

similarly
אַז מ'קומט נאָך די ירושה, מוז מען אָפט בּאַצאָלן קבורה געלט

transliterated
az m'kumt nokh di yerushe, muz men oft batsolen kvu're gelt

in English
one who comes for his inheritance, often ends up paying for the funeral 

in Hebrew
כשבאים לקחת הירושה, לעיתים משלמים גם עבור הקבורה


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A proverb is a short, generally known sentence of the folk which contains wisdom, truth, morals, and traditional views in a metaphorical, fixed and memorizable form and which is handed down from generation to generation





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